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positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
a plea to allies of the palestinians in particular. the president of egypt, the prime minister of turkey said if you would like to see a two-state solution in the near future, a palestinian state next to israel this has to deescalate now. the president expressing this fear if hamas doesn't stop rocket attacks on to israel's soille he fears left unsaid is israel may retaliate and turn in to a ground war and then the idea of a two-state solution in the peace process will be in the way distant future. obviously the middle east peace process has been on hold for quite sometime. he was asked about this trip will include a visit to myanmar which is also known as burma. he was asked whether it was too soon. a lot of human rights violations taken in burma and he wouldn't have gone if aung san suu kyi didn't think it was right for him to go. a few notes to point out. one is during -- before the press conference he and secretary clinton were visiting a mondastermonastery. they were joking about getting prayers over the fiscal cliff. the president at the press conference was asked what about what k
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
. and if the diplomats, i know that ban ki-moon, the u.s. secretary general is on his way to egypt and israel. he's trying to get something going. i know representatives from all these other countries that have relations with hamas like e kwijipt and qatar and turkey, they're trying to get something going. there's intense efforts behind the scenes. i don't know if they're going to result in anything. i was asked yesterday what i thought the chances of a serious-fire were. i thought yesterday about 50/50. i haven't been able to talk with anybody in a position of authority here in israel. i've been here in the southern part along the border not far from the -- from gaza. but it doesn't look very promising. let's see if the diplomats can get something going. you point out that the feelings on both sides seem to be intensifying in a bad way. and i think that's right. >> senator john mccain came out and said, you know, we should send bill clinton in. he should be the mediator in this latest conflict. would israel or gaza welcome bill clinton? >> reporter: i've been saying that, actually, myself. i wro
spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiative called teen cancer america. it aims to set up hospitals and medical centers in the strategic areas across the country. see their remarks live beginning at 1 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public atears. weak dies fee you are -- weekdays featuring live coverage of the senate and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> former national security adviser stephen hadley was among the speakers at a recent conference focusing on national security challenges facing the united states. he said the top priority should be getting
a lot right now, and that is egypt that's taking a very firm stance, calling this an israeli aggression. but one of the interesting things that tony blair, the former british prime minister said, he said of course, right now everybody is on the phone, everybody is trying to negotiate, everybody is trying to bring the violence to an end. but at this point in time it certainly looks very much as though things are escalating rather than deescalating and that is certainly the message that we are getting from the israeli defense forces. >> fred pleitgen, thank you very much indeed. >>> joining me is the israeli ambassador to the u.n. welcome to you, sir. >> thank you. good evening. >> this is a dangerous situation, isn't it. what is your reading of what is happening on the ground? we're hearing tonight of 2,000 troops being moved, israeli troops, maybe 30,000 others being brought up as well. what are you hearing and what is the plan? >> well, i won't get into military operations but it has to be very, very clear. israel and israel's government will do anything it takes to protect its citizen
are coming up through egypt into the gaza strip. there is a report that came out over the weekend. we'll take it one more step. the issue of iran over here to the east. the reports that iran are shipping weapons and rockets into sudan and truck north into egypt and into the gaza strip. if that's the argument you are making how do you stop this once and for all. >> our problem is not our border gaza but other country's borders with gaza. among the rockets being fired at us come directly from iran. hama terrorists have trained with the iranians. there is a strong connection. i can't see your map. gaza looks like a small place. but this is no more a struggle between small israel and small gaza and the cuba missile crisis was a struggle between the u.s. and cuba. all these groups to one degree or another are supplied and funded by the terrible regime in iran. bill: we come back to the basic question, that's what the world is waiting to know. will there be an invasion of gaza or not? >> we have to keep that option open. when you have half of your population in bomb shelters or a 15-second run to t
issue is egypt, they are supporting the palestinian tph-s this matter. we are looking at the results of the arab spring. jon: egypt now run by the muslim brotherhood of which hamas is an offshoot. >> that's right. morisi has come out in support of the palestinians. even though the rocket attacks, this violence was initiated by the palestinians. you have the camp david aeu koerbgsdz thaccords, the arab spring. the middle east is a mess. look in iran the centrifuges are still spinning. secretary panetta, and secretary clinton are in asia right now. that pivot, are we pivoting away from the challenges and our interests in the middle east, which is really a mess. jon: you worry we are leaving the israelis high and dry on this one? >> it could be. i don't know exactly what is going on with the administration. they have mad said some of the right things in sue mort of supporting israel. we are reaping the fruits of our labors in the middle east. and our policies in the middle east has been a real failure. if we are shipping through the pacific where are we going to have the planes and tank
break out in egypt as police fired teargas into the crowds. here are some of those scenes. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close ele
of an effort to engage egypt trying to act as a middle man or not much of a concerted effort to the netanyahu government's part to build up the palestinian authority in the west bank. was this really necessary at this point for israel to act like this? >> the israelis were getting hit by quite a number of rockets, and it's within their judgment to defend themselves and take actions to defend themselves. there are facts here that make you wonder whether or not the israelis may have acted hastily? namely the fact that in addition to hamas there are other actors in the game here. a lot of people are al qaeda types firing the rockets. they consider themselves enemies of hamas. they are firing lots of rockets at israel, and israel is blaming those attacks on hamas because hamas is the regional power broker. i don't know if that's really going to progress ourselves forward. these kind of al qaeda splinter groups never stop firing rockets. hamas has no control over them. if there's a constant cycle where these groups fire a rocket to become a spoiler, israel retaliates and there's a clush of forces
as rockets continue to fill the air over israel and gaza and a planned cease fire, visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister may not be holding up. senior international correspondent sarah sidner is in the middle of it all. she has more for you from gaza city. >> reporter: what is happening on both sides of the gaza/israel border looks and feels like war to anyone who has to live with it, no matter what the governments on either side have declared. this is a small taste of what it fe felt like in gauza over a 24-hor period. >> that is exactly -- all right. i'm going to move out of the way and let you get a look here. i'm going to let you get a lock at what is going on. i can see the black smoke. it's difficult to capture on camera. you saw that flash. this is what we have been dealing with all day. we've also been dealing with -- i'm sorry, the power has just gone out. we have been dealing with power outages, wolf. this feels like war. it may not have been declared, but it feels like war to the civilians who live here. >> the booms and smoke from targeted air strikes from morning till night
. >> this is just an example. there are women all over the middle eave, yemen, tuknees yark egypt, they are using social media to show what is really going on there. so try to help mobilize others and to get attention to what the plight of women is. it is absolutely inappropriate that it could be taken down. i think it's back up now. >> greta: it is back up and facebook has apologized. but it ising about that the knee-jerk reaction to remove this picture because there were people where she was living that objected to an unveiled woman. they didn't want that on the facebook page. >> doesn't surprise me, having been in the middle east and saudi arabia and afghanistan and all sorts of places in africa, doesn't surprise me. but very disturbing that facebook would be willing to take it down. >> greta: it's hard to imaginer here, the education, women couldn't get educated. a 14-year-old pakistani girl was hotted in head for confronting pakistan on education. >> the war on women, women who are honor killed after they were raped. they can't go to school, leave their house, travel. this is when we should
type into the search engine the word egypt, and they got a totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on. every time we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gathering information. we are giving information about what we buy, about what we like, about what our political bias sees maybe -- biases may be, and you and i ought to get the same information if we tie in the same word. that is kind of scary. >> somebody is making up their mind about what we want. >> it is not somebody. it is a series of 0s and 1s. it is a computer algorithm. >> the algorithm is fine, and i understand it exists, and i will salute it. is there, but i want to know what that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers some say -- something? who is going to cover a war? who is going to cover a campaign? without the journalists doing on is information gathering, all this stuff is below it. >> there are plenty of people who are going to do gathering, but the key word -- >> that is not true. there are fewer reporters covering the war in afghanistan then ther
saw this massive push in this really indigenous push within egypt, tunisia, and other democratic governments. some of those movements have had potentially scary things. there are some islamic fundamentalist parties that we do not have great relationships with and they understand that can be confusing thing. what obama has tried to do and in his famous speech in cairo is that he wants to deal with these countries and talk to the electorate. now we have an entirely different landscape, but in egypt, libya, and tunisia. relationship with these countries, these are countries with democratic governments. some of them have chosen paths that are a little more moderate, some leaning a little bit more to the fundamentalist side, but they're still fundamentally democratic and that will be a big challenge for the obama administration. host: its next for egypt? -- what is next for egypt? ?uest: in terms of ta host: the obama administration. guest: they still need to establish some of the legitimate government there. after the incredibly uplifting movements in it to rear square, it has devolv
next door in syria. you have a different government in egypt and the morrisey government is reacting differently than perhaps the mubarak government did before. >> what's the short-term solution then? >> well, i think the danger for israel for example, it has a right of self-defense, but obviously if it decides to return ground troops to gaza the optics there work against israel in a much -- in a region that now is governed far more by populism than by authoritarianism. i think it has to make sure that its response is aggressive, tries to deal with the threat to israel's people, but doesn't go too far. >> let's talk about the united states' potential role. health care was president obama's defining achievement for his first term. when we look at a second term will the president look at middle east peace, the road map to peace might this be his big deal for his second term? does it need to be? >> i think that's part of the motivation here. you know, you have coming up the palestinian authority which of course controls the west bank but not gaza is preparing to try to move toward enhan
for our reporting is the cia director had this recent trip to egypt, and that was at the end of october. he was there to investigate and learn more about something called the nasser sell, a group that is part of the jamal network that has been figured in the benghazi attack. will we understand is that the director went to libya either before or after the stop in egypt, and he did go there to talk to his cia folks on the ground about the mx operation as well as the attack. again, it is his firsthand knowledge of what happened that evening and also his firsthand knowledge of the people who were there that day, which only he can present to capitol hill and not the acting director. lou: thank you very much. always terrific reporting. more on the patraeus scandal, political and national security implications, the impact on the benghazi probe, and, indeed, impact on the u.s. government throughout this broadcast. lou: with the election behind us to work in washington begins. president obama and speaker say they're ready to deal. are republicans selling of the voters sent to washington, leaving
to be lending humanitarian effort to from- the country of egypt. and there is also supposed to be a cease-fire but rockets for still exchange. we are still trying to figure out what is the united states relationship with egypt. this will complicate that as far is the arabic movement and also visit israel is occupied with the potential ground war floor takes many resources from one is going on with syria and iran. the role of syria is very important for the united states. >> you mentioned other countries and this could spill over the borders and extent. beyond israel and gaza >> syria is occupied with itself and iran. is also workiworried but if we are looking at any ground war in complicates our relationship with the world because for must su support israel and we will support israel. however that set terms out in terms of the rest of the persian gulf is something that we worry about. it is pins and needles with that is the price we pay and willing to pay for our relationship with israel. >> thank you, michael. you can follow him on twitter... his website michael yaki.com also have democr
but egypt and possibly beyond. jenna: let's focus on syria. this conflict has been going on for 19 months. woe just heard news that the opposition group there elected a leader, a christian, the second-in-command being a member of the muslim brotherhood. we keep hearing that the opposition forces are very amorphous, we can't side with them because they don't know who they are. how do we interrupt the forces if they are keith a network and are at work in this region? >> jenna, very interesting we moved from we don't know who they are to we very well know who they are at this time. the central force and opposition is the muslim brotherhood. there is consensus among the region and observe. >> the number two of the new group, is a number two of the muslim brotherhood in syria. the chief, the new president of the council is indeed a christian. he is secular. he has been very liberal. he will oppose the muslim brotherhood. the problem, jenna, he doesn't have influence. those who control the ground are islamist militias. those who control most of the institutions are muslim brotherhood. you have
in charge of egypt, but more importantly with the iranian regime. hamas is escalating against the israelis was prompted their response to put pressure on israel and divert the attention from syria. that is the way to get out of the syrian complex situation. this is a challenge to the administration. wh would you do if israel takes out the hamas military leader? it's a big question. lou: and a question that we're going to turn to judy miller for the answer when we come back. is this a strategic response that will drive straight at the heart of the iranians and put in jeopardy their strategy in the region? how much danger kuwait's all of us as a result? ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] the mercedes-benz winter event is back, with the perfect vehicle that's just right for you, no matter which list you're on. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 c250 for $349 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. . lou: the decision of made not, not to save those americans, your reaction? >> look, the center of the whole affair, basically is why was this a decision in s
with the muslim brotherhood now in charge of egypt, but more importantly with the iranian regime. hamas is escalating against the israelis was prompted their response to put pressure on israel and divert the attention from syria. that is the way to get out of the syrian complex situation. this is a challenge to the administration. what would you do if israel takes out the hamas military leader? it's a big question. lou: and a question that we're going to turn to judy miller for the answer when we come back. is this a strategic response that will drive straight at the heart of the iranians and put in jeopardy their strategy in the region? how much danger kuwait's all of us as a result? back with the "a-team" in just moments. look, if you have copd like me, you know it can be hard to breathe, and how that feels. copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-s. spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled copd maintenance treatment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromide in
. >> how hard was it to get in from egypt? >> a lot of bureaucratic hassles the border is still apparently controlled by the old security services who were under mubarak, close to assad, the caa. it is hard to know how much is bureaucrats try to make life difficult dullish trying to make life difficult, and how much is planned harassment. for the gazans, it is no joke. if you want to go somethinthrouh something like past for control, is like three hours. >> while you're there, another freedom flotilla ship tried to get in from scandinavia. what was the response on land? >> it was a lot of excitement. people are very happy to know that someone knows they are there, and that people are willing to risk something. it is not a joke. they're trying to break through. we had a press conference at the port. to my amazement, it was uncovered in the most reactionary newspaper in israel. but for the people there, it is just a sign that they have not been forgotten, maybe they will get out. >> we're speaking to the first time after president obama was reelected read your thoughts? >> their two good thi
don't think that's the objective here. >> so you mentioned the egypt n egyptians in the past, given the instability right now in egypt, is the new egyptian government poised at all to play a role here? >> i mean in the old days under mubarak you have the intelligence chief who passed from the scene try to broker something between israelis and hamas. he had good contacts with the palestinians and the israelis. you got a different situation here. i mean, hamas is -- as you know, an outgrowth of the muslim brotherhood. i think morrissy will try to walk a fine line, particularly if they're increasing civilian casualties in gaza between blasting, but preserving his relationship and the economic support in the assistance he needs from the international community. he did noes the no wan -- >> aaron david miller, thank you so much with the woodrow wilson international center. good to see you. >> a pleasure. >>> as we reported, president barack obama just lashed out at two republican senators. john mccain and lindsey graham, at his news conference in washington. senators graham and mccain sa
. including violence flaring once again in egypt's capital. lisa, what's going on? >> wolf, police and protesters scuffled near cairo's tahrir square with arrests of young people many still upset by president mohamed morsi's move to consolidate his power. the muslim brotherhood is supporting nationwide rallies to support the president. the new constitution meantime says it has almost finished its final draft. and the e.p.a. is temporarily banning bp from competing for new government contracts. in the wake of the 2010 gulf oil spill, the agency says it is taking action because of bp's "lack of business integrity." as of february bp had $9 billion in contracts with the feds. bp it expects this ban to be lifted shortly. and the manager who oversaw apple's flawed maps program on its new iphone has been fired. rich williamson was fired just before the thanksgiving holiday. he had been with apple for about a decade. the flawed maps app forced ceo tim cook to issue a public apology after the iphone's debut in september. and if you've ever dreamed of an intimate dinner with betty white, we
behind palestinianian civilians. but the government in egypt, which was backed by the administration, has condemned israel, not hamas. the terrorist group hamas doesn't want peace with israel. it wants war. it kills israeli citizens and then hides behinds the skirts of palestinian women. israel has the moral right and duty to defend itself from the bar barrack hamas. the united states should be in total support of israel, our ally. the u.s. should be bold in its condemnation of hamas and the u.s. should be bold in this continuing war by terrorist, like hamas, on civilized nations and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. blumenauer: thank you, madam speaker. perhaps one of the best parts of serving in congress is the access to our library, the library of congress, the dedicated staff at c.r.s., the magnificent reading room. the library of congress is a national treasure. and leading the library of congress is dr. james billington. he was a scholar and institutional leader be
for life. only from aveeno. egypt's tahrir square. they say that they are going to stay there until mohamed morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee re
a lot done. there's late reports egypt is closing borders to israel. that's not confirmed, but traders are talking about that. today, it seems even after a bullish weekly energy report, prices are going back down, especially here in the u.s.. those concerns about the fiscal cliff and weakening demand is really hurting prices right now. back to you. dennis: thunk phil flynn. cheryl: shoppers, mortgages are being sold in aisle 5. seriously. banks continue to make it tougher to refinance, and costco and wal-mart offer lopes and even business loans. professor at george mason, says the banks have nobody to blame but themselves. anthony, thank you for being here. consumer groups, advocate groups up in arms about this saying regulation needs to come down on retailers. that far into this now? >> well, the answer is this is a classic example of adam smith's invisible hand. we went through, put through the dodd-frank legislation, created a consumer protection bureau to tighten down on this stuff, and what happens? the market finds a way. they did. they go to costco, wal-mart, set up loans, const
between egypt and yemen. i think we know that saudi arabia had mixed feelings about how quickly mubarak was dumped, and -- but they also, the saudis playeded a crucial role of easing yemen. it was not easy. it was slow. it was bloody, but compared to the other changes, it was not that bad. in april of to 20* -- 2011, just as the arab spring was in full bloom, if you will, the c7 finance ministers met in france and formed a partnership with the vision that was simple that europe had been through this kind of thing before. after eastern europe broke away
your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >>> want to talk about egypt here. we have new images from cairo's tahrir square. riot police firing tear gas on protesters. more clashes today over a move by egyptian president mohamed morsi to extend his powers. the protesters insist they will stay in the square until morsi gives back some of the sweeping powers he seized all of six days ago. an update on that fire at this bangladesh clothing factory that killed 111 workers. today, three supervisors at the factory have been arrested. that's the news here. they're accused of locking the main gate at the facility making it impossible for people to run out and away from the fire. >>> a ponzi scheme has been uncovered at the kabul bank in afghanistan. hundreds of millions of dollars siphoned from the savings of regular folks. >> $935 million had been lost through loan book scheme. additional $66.2 million lost through other forms. >> the victims here are people who were convinced to put the money into a western style bank, seen as a symbol of hope for a country emerging
, and they simply typed into the search engine the word egypt. and they got totally different responses. why? because there is that process going on, every time that we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gather information, we are getting information. we're getting information about what we buy, about what we find interesting, about what we like, about perhaps what our political biases may be, so that in theory a search engine that ought to be giving me objective information, and you and i ought to get the same information if we type in the same word, not so anymore. that's kind of scary. >> because somebody is making up his or her mind as to what it is that we want. >> it's not somebody. it is, it is a series of zeros and ones. it's a series of, it is the computer, what is the word i'm looking for? [laughter] algorithm, thank you. [laughter] it is the algorithm which is -- >> algorithm is defined, understand it exists, and i respected and i will salute it. it so there. but i want to know what all of that has to do with journalism? who gets up in the morning and covers somet
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)